Metropolitan Museum Of Art

1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street
New York, NY 

+ Google Map

Degas-at-the-Met-2

Explore a vast collection that spans millennia and continents. You might get lost searching for iconic favorites in the grand halls and you’ll definitely discover fascinating art that appeals all ages.

* Advance timed tickets required. Temperature checks on entry and face coverings required. Coat check is temporarily closed.

* The American Wing Cafe is open with a limited menu. Rooftop and other cafes are closed.

* Stream select audio content in the galleries on your phone for free. Audio guide rentals not available.

* On crowded days (or any day), enter through the accessible Uris Center for Education entrance on 81st Street to avoid long lines.

* Look at and perhaps print the engaging family guides & maps with titles like Explore Arms and Armor: Fierce or Fancy?, Animals All Around and Percy Jackson & the Olympians. No paper maps or guides available on site.

* Walk like an Egyptian inside the Temple of Dendur and say hello to nearby crocodile and feline statues. Admire enchanting sculptures, fountains and Central Park in the American Wing Courtyard. Compare the chain mail of European knights on horseback with elaborate Japanese samurai gear in Arms and Armor. Be amused and frightened by the oversized carvings of realistic and fantastical creatures in Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The Van Goghs, Monets and Degas in 19th- And Early 20th-Century European Paintings And Sculptures are a must for all ages. Wander around and be surprised and delighted as your kid finds his or her own favorites.

* Prepare for your visit (or reminisce after) by reading You Can’t Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum which pairs the adventures of a balloon flying around NYC with artwork from the Met.

Thursday & Friday: 12 pm – 7 pm
Saturday–Monday: 10 am – 5 pm
Closed Tuesday & Wednesday

In America: An Anthology of Fashion & A Lexicon of Fashion

Try to figure out what’s happening in cinematic “freeze frames” produced in collaboration with notable American film directors including Sofia Coppola, Regina King, Martin Scorsese and Chloé Zhao. Personality-filled mannequins in fashions from dating from the eighteenth century to the present are featured in vignettes installed in American Wing period rooms spanning 1805 to 1915: a Shaker Retiring Room from the 1830s; a nineteenth-century parlor from Richmond, Virginia; a panoramic 1819 mural of Versailles; and a twentieth-century living room designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, among others. Each room tells a story – our favorite was a 18th century card game gone wrong with a warring cat and rat.

In companion exhibit In America: A Lexicon of Fashion, admire  approximately 100 men’s and women’s ensembles by a diverse range of designers from the 1940s to the present, presented in three-dimensional “patches” of a quilt. 12 sections explore defining emotional qualities: Nostalgia, Belonging, Delight, Joy, Wonder, Affinity, Confidence, Strength, Desire, Assurance, Comfort, and Consciousness.

See our complete guide to the Met.

Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room

Explore a fantastical reimagining of what if Seneca Village—a vibrant nineteenth-century predominantly Black community-displaced to make way for Central Park- had been allowed to thrive into the present and beyond. Every artwork, from Bamileke beadwork and 19th-century American ceramics to new pieces, each telling a rich story (explained through informative descriptions throughout)

Like other period rooms throughout the Museum, this installation is a fabrication of a domestic space that assembles furnishings to create an illusion of authenticity. Unlike these other spaces, this room rejects the notion of one historical period and embraces the African and African diasporic belief that the past, present, and future are interconnected and that informed speculation may uncover many possibilities. Powered by Afrofuturism—a transdisciplinary creative mode that centers Black imagination, excellence, and self-determination and activated through vision, sound, and storytelling, and furnished with a kaleidoscope of works from The Met’s collection—from Bamileke beadwork and 19th-century American ceramics to contemporary art and design that celebrates rich and diverse traditions—the room foregrounds generations of African diasporic creativity and celebrates Black history.

See our guide to the Met.

Met Roof Garden

Take in stunning views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline from the roof of the Met. Logistics prevented this year’s installation dues, but it is a still a lovely spot for fresh air and snacks. Purchase fancy popcorn, nuts, chips, prosciutto skewers and more plus fruity adults beverages from the rooftop cafe or bring your own food.

⁣Closed on rainy days.

See our guide to the Met.

Chroma: Ancient Sculpture in Color

Did you know Ancient Greek and Roman sculpture was once colorful? Learn the colorful backstory of polychromy (“many colors” in Greek) in an exhibit highlighting cutting-edge scientific methods used to identify ancient color and examining how color helped convey meaning in antiquity.⁣⁣
⁣⁣
Presented alongside original Greek and Roman works representing similar subjects are reconstructions of ancient sculptures in color, as well as a new reconstruction of The Met’s Archaic-period Sphinx finial. The reconstructions are the result of a wide array of analytical techniques, including 3D imaging and rigorous art historical research. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣
Explore more (and bring a sphinx sculpture into your space) with a Chroma AR experience.

The Met

Explore a vast collection that spans millennia and continents. You might get lost searching for iconic favorites in the grand halls and you’ll definitely discover fascinating art that appeals all ages.

* Purchase online tix in advance to save time. Coat check is temporarily closed. On crowded days (or any day), enter through the accessible Uris Center for Education entrance on 81st Street for shorter lines.

* There is so much to see! From the education center, go through the lovely Greek and Roman Galleries to the must-see Van Goghs, Monets and Degas ballerinas in 19th- And Early 20th-Century European Paintings And Sculptures on the second floor.

* Try to figure out what’s happening in cinematic “freeze frames” produced in collaboration with notable American film directors in In America: An Anthology of Fashion. Personality-filled mannequins in fashions from dating from the eighteenth century to the present are featured in evocative vignettes in furnished period rooms.

* Also amid the extravagant period rooms, see fascinating artworks in all sorts of media in Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room, an an imagining of what might have been if a Seneca Village survived.

* Take in stunning views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline plus get fresh air and a snack from the spacious Roof Garden.

* Say ni hao the koi fish in the serene Astor Chinese Garden Court on your way to walking like an Egyptian at the Temple of Dendur, with stunning Central Park views plus crocodile, feline and sphinx statues. Admire enchanting sculptures, fountains and Central Park in the American Wing Courtyard. Compare the chain mail of European knights on horseback with elaborate Japanese samurai gear in Arms and Armor.

* And so much more…wander around and be surprised and delighted as your kid finds his or her own favorites. Ask friendly information desk workers (or search online) for whatever kids are into- we’ve discovered works with turtles, trains, chess, princesses and other current obsessions.

* Look at and perhaps print at home the engaging family guides & maps with titles like Explore Arms and Armor: Fierce or Fancy?, Animals All Around and Percy Jackson & the Olympians.  Some of these guides are available for free at the Information Desks, and from time to time we rotate the selection.

* Stream select audio content in the galleries on your phone for free. Audio guide rentals not available.

* Join excellent free family programs including art-making in the galleries.

🌳 Play before or after at the Egyptian-inspired Ancient Playground just north of the museum in Central Park.

🍽  Enjoy hot coffee, other beverages, and snacks in the gorgeous American Wing, or head downstairs to the reimagined Eatery with seasonal dishes including kid-friendly options (Thursday-Monday 11 am-4 pm).

🍽  More meal options at Bluestone Lane in (and outside) a historic church a few blocks north. Pick up classic treats including the famous black-and-white cookies at nearby William Greenberg.

Sunday-Tuesday & Thursday 10 am–5 pm
Friday & Saturday 10 am–9 pm
Closed Wednesday

Metropolitan Museum Of Art Storytime

Look, listen, sing, and have fun with picture books; then continue your adventure with a self-guided gallery hunt in the Museum. Geared toward families with children ages 18 months–6, but all ages welcome. Space is limited; first come, first served.

See our guide to the Met.

Start with Art/Art Trek

Fabulous museum educators engage children in conversations and activities related to a few works in the vast collection. Share ideas and enjoy stories, sketching, singing, and other gallery activities that bring works of art to life. Share ideas and enjoy stories, sketching, singing, and other gallery activities that bring works of art to life.

Art Trek is recommended for families with children ages 7 to 11 years; Start with Art for ages 3 to 6. Free with Museum admission, no reservations required.

See our complete guide to visiting the Met.

Watson Adventures: Whodunit at The Met Family Scavenger Hunt

Kids and adults work together to track a killer by solving his scavenger hunt in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. No knowledge of the museum or art is necessary; you just need sharp eyes and comfy shoes.

This hunt is for ages 10 and up. Each team must include at least one kid and one adult, with a maximum of six per team. Tickets include museum admission.